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How Redirect From /file.php To /file On Nginx?

- 1 answer

I'm currently hiding the .php extension from the urls on my nginx server with this configuration:

location / {
    try_files $uri $uri/ @extensionless-php;
    index index.html index.htm index.php;
}

location ~ \.php$ {
    try_files $uri =404;
    include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
    fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php/php7.2-fpm.sock;
}

location @extensionless-php {
    rewrite ^(.*)$ $1.php last;
}

This is working perfectly, but how can I make nginx not allow adding the .php extension?. In my example if you manually delete the .php it works but if you add it it remains permanent in the url.

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Answer

To redirect those requests permanently with HTTP 301 code try

rewrite ^(.*)\.php$ $1 permanent;

Put this directive before your location blocks.

Update

After this being answered, OP asked another question (now being deleted) - what if you have the following webroot structure:

webroot
|
+-- index.php (PHP file)
|
+-- somename.php (PHP file)
|
+-- somename (folder)
|   |
|   +-- index.php (PHP file)
|
+-- someothername (folder)
    |
    +-- index.php (PHP file)

Previous solution makes it impossible to serve somename.php file, because the request to http://example.com/somename would be redirected by try_files directive to http://example.com/somename/ and in next turn would be served with somename/index.php file.

This can be solved, but you'll have to stop using index and try_files directives and emulate their behavior with your own request processing logic. This is what I've ended up with:

map $original_uri $maybe_slash {
    ~/$      '';
    default  '/';
}

server {

    ...

    if ($original_uri = '') {
        set $original_uri $uri;
    }

    # redirect requests of '/somepath/somefile.php' to '/somepath/somefile'
    rewrite ^(.*)\.php$ $1 pemanent;

    location / {

        # this emulates 'try_files $uri $uri/ ...' directive behavior and redirects '/some/path'
        # to '/some/path/' if 'some/path.php' file does not exists, but 'some/path' folder exists
        # and there are 'some/path/index.html' file in that folder
        set $check_redirect $rewrited$maybe_slash;
        if ( $check_redirect = '1/' ) {
           return 301 $original_uri/$is_args$args;
        }

        if ( -f $document_root$uri.php ) { rewrite ^ $uri.php last; }

        # this emulates 'index index.php index.html' directive behavior
        if ( -f $document_root$uri${maybe_slash}index.php ) {
            set $rewrited 1;
            rewrite ^ $uri${maybe_slash}index.php last;
        }
        if ( -f $document_root$uri${maybe_slash}index.html ) {
            set $rewrited 1;
            rewrite ^ $uri${maybe_slash}index.html last;
        }

        # if a request for an absent resource should be served with some backend
        # controller, it is ok to use some 'try_files' directive here like
        # try_files $uri /index.php?path=$original_uri;

    }

    location ~ \.php$ {

        # this emulates 'try_files $uri $uri/ ...' directive behavior and redirects '/some/path'
        # to '/some/path/' if 'some/path.php' file does not exists, but 'some/path' folder exists
        # and there are 'some/path/index.php' file in that folder
        set $check_redirect $rewrited$maybe_slash;
        if ( $check_redirect = '1/' ) {
           return 301 $original_uri/$is_args$args;
        }

        # no 'try_files $uri =404'  or 'include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf' here, this location
        # can be reached only if requested PHP file is really exists in webroot folder
        include fastcgi.conf;
        fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$uri;
        fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php/php7.2-fpm.sock;

    }

}

With this configuration and webroot structure given above

  • request to http://example.com/ would be served with webroot/index.php file;
  • request to http://example.com/somename would be served with webroot/somename.php file;
  • request to http://example.com/somename.php would be redirected to http://example.com/somename and served with webroot/somename.php file;
  • request to http://example.com/somename/ would be served with webroot/somename/index.php file;
  • request to http://example.com/someothername would be redirected to http://example.com/someothername/ (since no webroot/someothername.php file exists) and served with webroot/someothername/index.php file.

Important note about custom HTTP error pages

If you have some custom error page, for example webroot/error/404.php for HTTP 404 error, instead of usual way to define it like

error_page 404 /error/404.php;

you'd need to skip .php extension of that file:

error_page 404 /error/404;
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source: stackoverflow.com
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